“I want my MTV.”  I remember hearing that demand and even demanding it myself in the early 1980s.  Today, MTV rarely even shows music videos anymore.

A couple of years ago, MySpace repositioned as a site for musicians and bands to develop communities of fans, share their music and videos, and more. But do people actually go to MySpace to watch music videos or concert clips?

Nope.

They go to YouTube.

And musicians and video producers have noticed.

This week at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference, Lady Gaga’s manager, Troy Carter (who is also Founder & CEO of Coalition Media Group), and Justin Bieber’s manager, Scooter Braun (who is also the Founder & Chair of SB Projects), talked about how the music industry, including music videos, has changed as the Internet and social Web have evolved.  They explained that the focus for musicians today isn’t on getting in MTV’s rotation, but rather on building a musician’s online identity with a focus on YouTube and Twitter.

As reported by MediaBeat, Lady Gaga’s manager admitted that he and his client create videos with YouTube in mind, and Justin Bieber’s manager told the audience how his client’s career sprang from his viral popularity on YouTube.

In Lady Gaga’s manager’s words, “nobody does MySpace anymore.”

It’s truly amazing to watch so many different industries completely transform as the social Web evolves.  Who would have thought in the 1980s when my generation was begging our parents to get cable so we could watch U2, Duran Duran, Michael Jackson, and The Police that we’d have access to those videos and so much more at our fingertips thanks to the tools of the social Web like YouTube.

And this is still just the beginning of what the social Web has to offer in terms of online video.  One can only speculate about the cool things to come!

What do you think?  Has YouTube redefined entertainment for you?

And just for fun … check out the compilation video of several of those “I Want My MTV” commercials from the early 1980s, which I found on YouTube, ironically.

Image: Flickr