Flowtown created an extremely cool blog post with a graphic that showed the “most-shared” news sites as well as how those sites are shared, who the biggest influencers of those sites are via Twitter, and what stories they’re sharing.  You can follow the link to view the complete graphic, which Flowtown developed using data from Backtype.com.

I think that one of the most interesting things the Flowtown graphic reveals is that 4 of the top 10 most shared sites on the Internet are new media publishers (i.e., blogs, some of which are syndicated by Newstex) while 6 are traditional news websites.

The top 10 most shared sites (blogs are in bold) according to the Flowtown and Backtype report are:

  1. Mashable.com
  2. NYTimes.com
  3. News.BBC.co.uk
  4. HuffingtonPost.com
  5. Guardian.co.uk
  6. TechCrunch.com
  7. CNN.com
  8. Online.WSJ.com
  9. Gizmodo.com
  10. Telegraph.co.uk

Another interesting aspect of the graphic tells us that by far, the most online sharing is done via Twitter.  For example, Mashable.com content was shared as follows (per the data provided by Backtype):

  • Twitter: 6,105,957
  • Digg Comments: 34,681
  • FriendFeed Shares: 4,890
  • Reddit Comments: 3,521
  • Hacker News Comments: 1,661

It would have been interesting to see Facebook sharing included in this graphic, and the timeframe and audience researched to collect the data wasn’t included in the blog post, but it’s very interesting nonetheless.

Who could have predicted 5 or 10 years ago that new media publishers would become some of the most engaging, shareworthy websites.  The term ‘blog’ has morphed from personal online diary to Authoritative Content publisher in many instances.  Newstex publisher partners demonstrate that with the authoritative content they publish everyday.  We’re not surprised by the Flowtown and Backtype findings displayed in this graphic at all.  Are you?

Image: Flowtown.com