In 2007, Hulu.com debuted and began offering online video service, including popular television shows, clips, movies and more.

The site is not just another YouTube. Instead, Hulu focuses on providing premium and long-form content through its free content offerings and its ad-supported subscription service. Today, Hulu video content comes from more than 260 content companies.

Predictions about who will buy Hulu have already started with Google, Netflix and Apple taking center stage as the most likely high bidders. All three companies could roll Hulu directly into their current strategic plans.

However, many corporate acquisitions have been made throughout history by the not-so-obvious buyers. It’s anyone’s guess who will be the winner and add Hulu to its content offerings. There are some great analyses of the Hulu sale on VideoNuze.com, which talk about potential Hulu buyers and why any deal for Hulu is unlikely.

At the end of the day, the Hulu brand success as it stands today is highly dependent on retaining contracts to acquire content from ABC, Fox and NBC. A new owner not only needs to work to sustain the content acquisition side of the business, which is ripe for advertising revenue gains, but also needs to find new ventures for the brand that will protect it from the loss of one or more of these content acquisition contracts in the future.

With the recent announcement by Verizon Wireless that hints to future caps on data plans, which could affect consumers’ online video viewing habits, potential buyers need to diversify more than ever. The online video market is still growing and thus, it’s highly tumultuous. Buying Hulu could be a great move for a company that is willing to take on some risk and bring a strong strategic plan for diversification to the table.

What do you think about the announcement that Hulu is for sale? Leave a comment and share your thoughts — the good and the bad.