blog mouseWhat’s your blogging process? That’s a question that Mitch Joel of Six Pixels of Separation asked blogging pros to answer recently, and the result is a collection of fantastic insights from seasoned bloggers.

No two bloggers follow the exact same process to create content, and that’s what makes blogging so interesting. Every blogger is able to show his or her unique insight and personality as they discuss a topic they feel strongly about.

Amber Naslund of Brass Tack Thinking paraphrased a quote from writer Joan Didion and explained her blogging process in seven words: “I write to discover what I think.” Amber explains that sometimes she has a clear idea of what she wants to communicate in a post and sometimes she’s writing to work through a question.

I can relate to this blogging process as I often find myself writing blog posts as a way to think through an issue. Twenty years ago, one might have referred to the process as “thinking out loud,” but today, we can “thing through blogging.” A blog is a great place to share your own expertise and thoughts, but it’s also a great place to recognize that you don’t know everything and invite your audience to join the conversation and share their insights, too. It offers an excellent opportunity to hear varying opinions and see the bigger picture from diverse perspectives. That’s one of the reasons why blog comments and social media sharing are so useful.

Amber is a successful social media strategist who spent several years with Radian6, and knows what bloggers are “supposed” to do to increase traffic. However, she explains that great blogs don’t have to be all about traffic statistics and search engine optimization. This is an important lesson to keep in mind for Authoritative Content publishers who focus more on quality of content than quantity of visitors. Amber wrote:

“[My blog has] never been a deliberate, crafted exercise in “what will make people hire me or buy stuff?” when I write. I suck at SEO, I don’t follow blogging “rules”, I don’t agonize over headlines like I should and I rarely pitch my stuff or write about the hot new thing or create controversy to stir some traffic. I couldn’t tell you what my traffic numbers are if you asked me, and that’s not humblebrag false humility BS, it’s seriously that I don’t know, because it’s not what I write for.”

In other words, there is no single recipe for blogging success, and each blogger can follow the blogging process that enables him or her to reach their individual goals.

You can follow the links to read more blogging processes from Christopher S. Penn of Awaken Your Superhero and Mark W. Schaefer of Grow. What is your blogging process?

Image: Svilen Milev