lawyer blog gavelWhere do people go to find out information about the law or to find legal counsel when they need it? They go to Google, just like they do for everything else they need today.

For lawyers, blogging offers a way to improve their website search engine results and grow their practices. However, it also gives them an opportunity to convert casual site visitors into clients, because they can prove their knowledge, expertise, and abilities through their content.

It’s important to point out, however, that not all blogs written by lawyers are equal. Authoritative Content legal blogs are written by actual attorneys (not law students or freelance writers with no legal experience), and those attorneys take the time to craft useful content. Their posts aren’t filled with keywords. Instead, they’re filled with meaningful information that is actually helpful to visitors.

Frankly, the internet needs more of these Authoritative Content legal blogs, but it can be very scary for lawyers to publish blogs. Why? Because they’re so aware of every word they write. They agonize over ensuring their words won’t be misinterpreted, because even though they have a disclaimer on their blogs saying the content should not be considered legal advice, people don’t pay attention. No lawyer wants someone to read a blog post, assume it’s legal advice that applies directly to their individual situation, and then act upon that information, because it might not be what is in that individual’s best interest. I’ve spoken to many attorneys who simply choose not to blog at all because of this concern.

However, there are many attorneys blogging who prove that it can be an extremely effective tool to establish credibility, build their reputations, and build their businesses. For example, Steven Gursten of Michigan Auto Law (syndicated by Newstex) published a blog post recently that shared seven reasons lawyers should blog. He wrote, “My blog writing has led to a number of news reporters contacting me, including all of the metro Detroit newspapers and TV stations, and even the New York Times, Bloomberg and NPR.”

Guersten’s advice to other lawyers who are considering writing blogs is simple. He advises lawyers to write their own content, be state-specific, and focus on quality. His secret is, “Writing about original content, analyzing and writing, hopefully, insightful criticism of the new legal cases—and at times, expanding to other topics that are interesting to me.”

Follow the link above and check out his post. Notice the personable writing style he uses. His post is not filled with legalese. It’s written in an authoritative yet personable voice for an audience of people who are looking for answers to legal questions, and that’s what makes it work!

Image: Jason Morrison